Doing the Maths: Financial Considerations of Cloud Computing

The benefits of cloud computing are well-established, but what are the financial considerations your organisation should take when transitioning its infrastructure from on-premises to the cloud?

Believe it or not, cloud computing has existed for over two decades. But it’s never been more essential to our day-to-day lives than it is now, with so many of the things we do – booking taxis, paying bills, chatting with friends and family, and myriad other activities – dependant on the cloud.

Every day, more and more public sector organisations transition more and more of their infrastructures to the cloud. By doing so, they are able to manage budget constraints, achieve flexibility when compared to long-term legacy contracts, and make cost savings that can be reinvested into frontline services.

The benefits of cloud transition are well-known, but one thing that may be stopping your organisation from taking the plunge is understanding the financial considerations.

If you’re considering moving services to the cloud but you’re not sure where to start, we’re here to guide you. At Six Degrees we’ve already enabled over 300 organisations to embrace the cloud, and we’ve gained insights into the financial considerations of cloud computing that we believe will support you during your decision making.

In this blog we’ll take you through the positive – and negative! – financial implications of cloud computing, and explain how cloud computing will impact your financial operating model. Let’s get started.

Positive and Negative Implications

In order to gain a rounded view of the financial implications of cloud computing, it’s important to understand both the positive and negative aspects of moving your infrastructure to the cloud. As far as positive aspects, here are the headlines:

  • Cloud computing delivers greater cost agility, enabling you to reduce expenses as you reduce demand for services.
  • Since you don’t need to invest upfront in hardware, or refresh that hardware as part of a refresh cycle, cloud computing enables you to increase your retained cash.
  • For public sector organisations dealing with budget constraints, cloud computing is a great way to reduce opportunity costs and free up cash that can be reinvested into frontline services.

There are, however, some potentially negative implications of cloud computing:

  • Software as a service (SaaS) models can result in organisations paying more for additional licences, but not less for fewer.
  • Although money is saved in upfront costs subscription fees for cloud computing are typically higher than for on-premises deployments.
  • If you transition your data from SaaS back to an on-premises deployment, costs can be surprisingly high.

Weighing up the positive and negative financial considerations of cloud computing is important, but once you decide to proceed you will need to evolve your financial operating model in tandem. In the following section we’ll explain how.

Evolving Your Financial Operating Model

Cloud transformation will fundamentally change your organisation’s IT operating model. Here’s how it will benefit your core financial statements:

  • Balance sheet. Cloud computing makes your balance sheet more agile, shifting fixed assets to cash. Many organisations are locked into long-term legacy data centre contracts. These contracts can limit the cash and capital required to evolve citizen services in-line with their developing needs. Cloud computing enables you to shift legacy investments to developing cloud applications and other projects that drive improvements in citizen services.
  • Cash flow statement. Organisations that transition to cloud computing save cash by moving away from cyclical and sporadic IT asset purchases. By paying for what you need, when you need it, you can increase visibility and predictability, and delay cash spend.
  • Income statement (profit and loss). Over time, you can improve profitability by reducing the cost to deliver equal or larger IT value by taking advantage of cloud computing’s inherent flexibility, low management costs, broad portfolio of services and flexible pricing models.

Financial Considerations of Cloud Computing

Public sector organisations are under increasingly scrutiny to derive the maximum value from the public purse. In this blog, we’ve taken a look at some of the financial considerations of cloud computing. At Six Degrees, we believe cloud computing makes it easier to manage budget constraints, achieve flexibility when compared to long-term legacy contracts, and make cost savings that can be reinvested into frontline services.

Is your organisation seeking to move away from a large outsourced infrastructure programme? Our new Springboard to the Cloud eBook examines the issues, processes, and technologies that can be adopted to provide public sector organisations with a journey to the cloud – a two-hop approach to transition, then transform to true public cloud delivery from legacy on-premises servers.

Subscribe to the newsletter today

Related posts

Springboard Your Journey to the Cloud: Plotting Your Digital Transformation Journey

Springboard Your Journey to the Cloud: Plotting

As citizens’ needs evolve, public sector organisations are

Springboard to Oracle Cloud

Springboard to Oracle Cloud

Transition, then transform to true public cloud delivery

Springboard to the Cloud eBook

Springboard to the Cloud eBook

An Infrastructure Journey for the Public Sector Trusted